We Could Have Been Arrested

On April 10, 1987 Coach and I met for the first time. The moment our eyes locked it was a done deal. I left NY to figure out my life after my x left me and Coach was there on a one-year missionary assignment. Of all places for a New Yorker and a Chicagoan to meet and fall in love…Virginia.

Exactly 20 years before our meeting, Loving  v. Virginia was argued, a landmark civil rights decision of the United States Supreme Court, which invalidated laws prohibiting interracial marriage. On June 12, 1967 the case was decided. The Court held, “There can be no doubt that restricting the freedom to marry solely because of racial classifications violates the central meaning of the Equal Protection Clause.” 

In 1967, 16 states still had anti-miscegenation laws, Virginia being one of them. Richard and Mildred Loving were a brave couple who blazed a path by just trying to live their lives. We are forever grateful for their stand.

 

 

 

 

36 thoughts on “We Could Have Been Arrested

      • So many people are oblivious to the world around them, I am grateful that some ‘things’ have changed! There are still those whose love is not accepted for one reason or another, wonderful that your story is not one of those although I am sure there are still times that there might well be challenges ❤

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        • Yes, we’ve had a few challenges and it shocks us when it happens. Like the time in Atlanta when no cab would pick us up. It was the first time for me experiencing such a thing. The look on my husband’s face was a combination of rage and protection. It broke his heart that I experienced it and it broke mine to witness the realization of what he has endured.

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  1. It just sounds so ridiculous when you think about it now. And still to this day we are fighting so that others can love who they choose to love. Thank you for reminding us that there are some things worth fighting for. Beautiful picture.

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  2. Happy “eyes locking” Anniversary! 🙂

    A beautiful couple, a beautiful picture and a beautiful story. Thank you for sharing.

    Love is love is love is love!!!

    xoxo

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  3. I always love the visual contrast, dark skin vs light. If we ever meet, you and Coach need to let me take artistic shots of you both together.

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    • I love that contrast, too. It’s one reason why we always have white sheets. His skin looks amazing on those sheets. I think I can speak for Coach when I say we’d love that! We’ve wanted shots done for a long time, but it just never came together.

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      • Well then, it’s decided. We just have to end up in the same city together. Sofia can be my photographer’s assistant this time. 🙂

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        • I’ll jump in and speak for me and say hello too.Yes we would love to get shots done. We may have a couple of opportunities this year to be out there so ‘ll see what we can make happen. I’m enjoying your blog.

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          • Well, if it isn’t the elusive Coach. Thought for a while you were just a figment of Elle’s imagination. 🙂
            Give us some notice if you’re planning to come out this way, and Sofia and I will do our best to be in the same city at the same time.

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              • Yes, those are good sucking up noises. Next time just leave the “up” out. Coach can thank me later.

                Fabulous tits by the way, Elle. I realize I didn’t comment on them before. Lucky hands, holding them.

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                • I’ll leave the “up” part to Coach and I’ll stick to the sucking. It’s quite something that you were looking at the aesthetics and contrast of the photo first. Thank you for your compliment. I’ve not had many, other than my husband’s, in more years than should have ever been allowed. I need to get used to it.

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  4. thank you for sharing this! My mother is white and my father is black and them getting together was hard. When my mother got pregnant with me they got married even though she was 18 and a senior in high school. Once the school found out my mother married a black man she was expelled. Today we can date and marry any race we want because of strong people like them that fought for what they wanted and believed in.

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    • Oh, Leo, what you wrote made my eyes fill with tears. I’ve heard countless stories like that and it chokes me up every time. Your mom must have been so scared, but she was no doubt a very brave woman. I look at my beautiful, intelligent, funny, and witty mixed race children and can’t imagine them not existing, but that was the heinous goal – to keep the races from mixing and reproducing. WE WON!!!! Thank you so much for sharing your story.

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      • Your welcome…and I am thankful that my mom fought to love who she wanted no matter the odds but I am also grateful that I was allowed the opportunity to grow up more as a person than as a race. I didn’t have to choose a side, I was just ME. Now people no longer look as you as white or black but accept that we multi racial or Mulatto and a race all our own.

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  5. Oh Elle. Stuff like this, little bytes from history that prove how far we’ve come as a society, it’s wonderful. (And, super hot pic, btw!!)

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  6. First, beautiful picture! Secondly, our world is sad. My parents were of different religious backgrounds, and I feel lucky to have been raised with 2 cultures. It enriched my life. However, it’s not hard for me to imagine a world that once didn’t approve of marriage based on skin color, since I live in a world that says people of the same sex can’t be married… You’d think by this day and age, the world would just respect and embrace that we’re all different and that is BEAUTIFUL! We’re all human, our hearts choose who we fall in love with and hearts don’t know the difference between skin color, age, sexual orientation, religion…. It doesn’t seem fair that I am able to be married to the love of my life because I happen to be hetero, but my gay/lesbian friends can’t because society doesn’t deem that ‘right’.

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    • Being raised with two cultures is a beautiful thing. Unfortunately there will always be those that want to regulate everything we do and say…government, church…I personally want them all out of my bedroom. They’ve had too much say in what I can and cannot do.

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  7. Loved this! In the Dominican Republic, there is a trademark ceramic called Lime’. The figurines or “munecas” depict Domincans in all walks of life and are wonderful (I have a collection from my time living there). The munecas are beautiful, and faceless, to represent there is no one Dominican face, as the range of the racial rainbow is represented in the DR mix. There are people of Spanish ancestry with the bluest eyes and mahogany skin, ebony skin from Haitian/African influence, cinnamon, moreno/mulatto, cafe, etc. [Sadly, despite this lovely artistic statement, racism is alive and well in the DR, where being “whiter” is considered better, and there is a terrible prejudice against Haitians (http://www.miamiherald.com/multimedia/news/afrolatin/part2) . On my last mission trip to Hispaniola, our Haitian interpreter related to us being in a DR upscale store once, and getting the evil eye from a “whiter” Dominicana (as most Haitians experience when they cross into the DR). He spoke up in his decent English, “May I help you, ma’am?” He said the moment the woman believed he might be African Amercian from the US vs. Haiti, she was friendlier.]

    The world has such a long way to go to becoming color blind (or as Beth Moore has said, “color blessed” or Technicolor vision), and quite frankly the US has made tremendous strides comparatively speaking. I dated many ethnic men, and it always was tough; my family was never comfortable. My personal belief for the Creator putting so many different faces and colors on the earth was for us to join/intermarry to become more in HIS image–as we are all created in His image. A radical notion, I know. Thanks for the history lesson Elle, and your story. Hot pic too! (brave!)

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    • My husband did two medical missions in Haiti (before the earthquake). He was the only black man on both trips. A Pastor that went with them ignorantly said that my husband would be safe because he’s black. The Haitians that were with the group spoke up and said that if there was any problem with the group and the authorities got involved they would immediately throw my husband in jail because he was black. It’s ignorance of cultures mixed with bias and sheer stupidity that cause a divide. My closest friend is Dominican (raised in NYC). That dark/light issue runs through the Dominicans in NYC as well. That was the bias I grew up with between northern Italians and southern Italians. It’s everywhere. Personally, I don’t believe in being color blind. I love the variety. It should be acknowledged. It’s the same as saying there’s no difference between men women. Yes, there is and it’s wonderful.

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